Skip to content

See My Interview – and Lots More – in a Free Parenting Summit

Hi everyone! I’ve been quiet these last few weeks as we’ve celebrated Cee’s 5th birthday (I know! I can’t believe it! Amazing girl…), had house guests, and already celebrated Thanksgiving on Sunday. My husband is working on Thursday, so we made some adjustments this year so we could all be together. We’re already on to turkey soup in our house!

A quick post today to get the word be the best parent you can beout about a free online parenting summit, featuring video interviews with 21 parenting writers and educators – including me! I recorded my interview with Jeanne-Marie Paynel of Voila Montessori this morning, and I enjoyed chatting with her about the challenge of sorting through overwhelming parenting information, as well as what science tells us about how newborn babies sense the world and how we can best care for them. Other speakers in the summit will discuss child behavior, development, mindful parenting, nutrition, and sleep. The summit includes a closed Facebook group for discussion about the interviews. It starts on December 1, and my interview is scheduled to be the first released. If you sign up, you’ll have access to a new interview each day of the summit. You can join the Be the Best Parent You Can Be summit HERE. I hope to see you there!

More science, coming soon!

Are the Ingredients in the Newborn Vitamin K Shot Safe?

The newborn vitamin K shot prevents rare but potentially devastating vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB). If you're concerned about the ingredients in the shot, I've investigated the science behind each one so that you can understand why it's included in the shot and why it's safe for your baby.

Read more

Come and Gone (A Miscarriage Remembrance)

I realized, late in the day, that today is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day. I want to send a big virtual hug to all of the families that are hurting, today and every day, because of babies lost to miscarriage, stillbirth, or infant loss. It brings back memories for me of our first miscarriage, a pregnancy conceived in this month in 2012. This is the first October since then that I’ve held my baby boy. Every day, I feel grateful for him and how he has made our family feel whole. Most days, though, I still think about those lost pregnancies, and I feel so much empathy for families who are suffering and waiting for a baby. It’s really, really hard.

Today, I dug back to find this little piece of writing and thought I’d finally share it. I wrote this after my D&C procedure on January 4, 2013. By then, we had known that the pregnancy wasn’t viable for two weeks, and the D&C was needed to finally end the pregnancy. (I wrote more about this miscarriage here and here.) It’s a very strange feeling to be carrying around a non-viable pregnancy for a so long, but it is even stranger to wake up from general anesthesia and feel such complete emptiness.

Come and Gone

Little one, you are gone this morning. All that remains of you is a feeling and a memory, and what I write on this page.

You were conceived in late October, in a cozy state park cabin rented in the off-season. The next morning there was snow on the ground, and the world looked brand new.

You were unexpected fatigue and sore breasts. You were two little blue lines on a pregnancy test, and then another just to be sure. You were the good news we shared.

You were my nausea and aversion to cheese, mushrooms, and leafy greens. You were the return of my linea nigra, stretching from belly button down to groin.

You were my July baby. You were visions of long walks on perfect summer days, of blankets laid out in the grass. We would lie down together to watch leaves wave from tree branches and the clouds drift by above.

You were so real.

But on the ultrasound, you were a smudge of grey without form or movement. You were the doctor’s furrowed brow and the tear on your daddy’s cheek.

You were a clump of cells, inside a set of membranes, in my body that didn’t realize you were already gone. Your heart might never have beat at all. You were already the most you would ever be.

You were an expanse of possibility inside of me that then shriveled away. You were a dream, unraveled to a wisp of thread. I will keep it just the same, wrapped in the more substantive fabric of our lives.

You were a life that was part of my life for a time. Your handful of cells held some of me and some of your father. You were made of our fathers and mothers and theirs before them.

You were a love not proportional to your size, so big it took us off guard. Only in losing you did we see how much of our hearts you had filled.

You have come, and you have gone. You were not quite right for this world. You were our miscarriage.


A science note, because I can’t help it: At the time that I wrote this, I’m not sure if I knew that fetal cells can remain in a mother’s blood and tissues after pregnancy, even one that is lost. So, I guess the first two lines of the piece above aren’t quite accurate. I probably still carry cells from my lost pregnancies in my body, and they may even be part of BabyM as well. That’s a wonderful thought, actually. 

After Another School Shooting, Doing My Best to Parent in a Scary World

Since last week’s shooting at Umpqua Community College, I’ve been thinking a lot about the problem of gun violence in our country. This isn’t a typical topic for me, but of all the things that we worry about as parents, this should probably be among the top of our list. Read more

Learning to Crawl Disrupts Infant Sleep (Or, Science Confirms What We’ve Already Observed)

Sometimes, when you're going through a rough patch with your baby's sleep, it helps just to know that it's normal. A recent study published in Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development helps in this regard, because it shows that when babies learn to crawl, they have a harder time sleeping during the night. I write about the study and about my own experiences with sleep disruptions in late infancy.

Read more

Where I’ve Been: Busy with Media Coverage of The Science of Mom!

I planned to be posting more frequently here on the blog over the summer, but my limited time has been filled up with responding to media requests about my book. That’s a great thing, and it’s been fun to hear from people interested in my book and to have the opportunity to talk about it.

The most exciting media opportunity was my interview with Rachel Martin on NPR’s Weekend Edition. I wrote about that experience on the blog here. After that broadcast, Amazon was sold out of my book by the end of the day! Reviews on Amazon have also been wonderful. Seriously, each one warms my heart, because it affirms that I accomplished what I set out to do with this book. Read more

Hear My Interview on NPR! And a few thoughts on it…

I was thrilled to be interviewed by Rachel Martin for NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. The interview aired yesterday, but you can listen to it and read the transcript here:

‘Science of Mom’: Scientist Sorts Through Studies So Parents Don’t Have To

I’m not going to even try to pretend that this was not a HUGE deal to me. I grew up listening to NPR every single day. We lived in a very small house, where the bedrooms were all basically right off of the kitchen, and the sounds of Morning Edition woke me up just about every morning. We listened to NPR in the car on the way to and from school and then back at home while we made dinner. The familiar voices of NPR hosts and the opening jingle were a part of my childhood. And while some kids might dream of being a professional athlete or famous actor, I dreamed of being on NPR. I figured that a good life goal was to do something interesting or useful enough to justify an NPR interview. I never dreamed that it might come out of a parenting blog, but life is full of unexpected surprises. Read more

5 Evidence-Based Tips for Your Baby’s First Shots

5 important things to know before your baby's first shots - supported by science!. Find out science-based ways to reduce your baby's discomfort and what to expect afterwards.

Read more

The Science of Mom: An Introduction

Get a sneak peek at my book, The Science of Mom! You can read the entire Introduction here!

Read more