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Does My Child Drink Too Much Milk?

glass of milk copyA couple of nights ago, I had the pleasure of going out for drinks with a couple of other moms, sans kids. Predictably, we ended up talking about our kids, among other things. One of my friends mentioned that her 2-year-old daughter is a big fan of cow’s milk, drinking about 3 cups per day. This reminded me of a study I’d gotten wind of earlier in the week that recommended kids drink only 2 cups of milk per day. Should my friend cut back on her daughter’s beverage of choice? I needed to look at the study more closely.

The study in question (The Relationship Between Cow’s Milk and Stores of Vitamin D and Iron in Early Childhood (1) – paywall) was conducted by a Toronto research group led by Jonathon Maguire and published on Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

The headlines about this study have made it sound like we now have the final word on just the right amount of cow’s milk for kids. The Atlantic posted a story with the headline “Kids Should Drink Exactly Two Cups of Milk per Day,” and others published similar statements. I will argue that it’s just not this simple, and prescriptive nutrition messages like these just end up confusing parents.

What is neat about this study is that it looked at two important nutrients for young kids: vitamin D and iron. Deficiency of both of these nutrients is common and cause for concern.

With enough UVB sun exposure, we can make our own vitamin D in our skin, but for many of us, that sun exposure is in short supply. Vitamin D deficiency is especially common in people who live at northern latitudes (north of a line between San Francisco and Philadelphia), where exposure to solar UVB radiation is limited. We also want to protect our children and ourselves from skin cancer, so we smartly cover up and use sunscreen to block those rays. In addition, those with darker skin absorb less UVB and are at higher risk for vitamin D deficiency. In the winter in Oregon, I assume that my family needs to get all of our vitamin D from our diet or supplements. There’s a nice list of vitamin D-rich foods here.

The most obvious sign of vitamin D deficiency is rickets, causing weakening of the bones and teeth, skeletal and dental deformities, and slowed growth. There has also been an explosion of new data over the last few decades linking subtler vitamin D deficiency to increased risk of infection, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and type 2 diabetes in adults. Several studies have found that children given vitamin D supplements in infancy and early childhood may be at lower risk for type 1 diabetes (2,3).

Iron is essential to muscle and brain development (4). Iron deficiency early in life can result in delays in motor skill development, as well as learning and behavioral problems that have been shown to last at least until adolescence. Iron is also a critical part of hemoglobin, which transports oxygen in the blood, and a person with severe iron deficiency will also have low hemoglobin and be anemic. See here for a list of dietary sources of iron.

Needless to say, you want your kid to get enough vitamin D and iron. So where does milk fit into this story? Milk is fortified with vitamin D and is one of the best sources of the nutrient in our food supply. Milk is also naturally high in calcium, and this combination is great for growing bones. The problem is that cow’s milk inhibits the absorption of non-heme iron (iron from plant foods). Plus, milk is low in iron, and there is a concern that kids that drink lots of milk will fill up on it and get fewer calories from iron-rich foods.

So, milk is good for vitamin D but bad for iron. This recent study asked an important question: How much milk is enough to provide adequate vitamin D without risking iron deficiency?

The study included children between the ages of 2 and 5, all residing in the Toronto area. This was an observational study, meaning that it simply looked at the relationships between several variables in kids living their normal lives, at one point in time. Parents were asked how much cow’s milk their kids drank, as well as whether they used vitamin D or iron supplements and how much time they spent outside per day. Blood samples were collected from a total of 1311 children. These samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D, an indicator of vitamin D status, and serum ferritin, indicating iron stores.

The data from this study are rather beautiful.

Roughly sketched from Maguire et al. Note that iron deficiency is diagnosed with serum ferritin is below 12 ug/L.

Roughly sketched from Maguire et al. Note that iron deficiency is diagnosed when serum ferritin is below 12 ug/L, which is off the scale for this graph.

They show that as milk consumption went up, so did vitamin D status, but iron status decreased. In other words, there appeared to be a trade-off between vitamin D and iron nutrition. This is not surprising given what we just discussed above.

The authors of this study then looked at how much milk was associated with adequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which has been estimated in earlier studies to be 75 nmol/L. Their data show that for the average kid, consuming 2 cups of milk per day was sufficient, with a little wiggle room to spare.

Now let’s look at the iron side of the story. As I mentioned, the data showed that as milk consumption increased, iron stores (measured by serum ferritin) decreased. And since the authors found that 2 cups of milk were enough to meet the vitamin D needs of the average child, they simply assumed that drinking any more milk could be to the detriment of iron nutrition.

The authors’ conclusion is this: “Two cups of cow’s milk per day appears sufficient to maintain healthy vitamin D and iron stores for most children.” That’s fair enough, but making the recommendation that children drink exactly 2 cups – as I’ve seen in the headlines – is quite a different story. There are a few reasons why I don’t think this study tells us that:

1. It is an observational study based on parents’ guesstimates of how much milk their kids drink. That’s problematic. For example, parents may intentionally or unintentionally misreport milk consumption – sort of rounding up or down – based on what they think their pediatrician wants to hear. They may simply not have a good mental picture of what 250 mL of milk looks like. (For the study, parents were asked, “How many 250-mL cups of cow’s milk does your child drink in a typical day?”) They may also not know exactly how much milk their kid drinks. If your child is in childcare or school, do you know how much milk he drinks during the day? (I don’t.) And a 5-year-old can help himself to milk from the fridge without being served by a watchful parent. All of these factors can introduce a lot of error to the variable of milk intake. I would hesitate to set a global nutrition recommendation based on an observational study.

2. The study doesn’t adequately address other sources of vitamin D. The data were adjusted for vitamin D supplementation, which was a factor for about 60% of the kids, though the paper doesn’t report how much supplemental vitamin D they were taking. There were also no data collected on other dietary sources of vitamin D in these kids. This seems particularly important since there appears to be a disconnect between the 2 cups of milk per day recommendation from this study, which would provide about 250 IU of vitamin D, and the AAP’s recommendation that children and adolescents get 400 IU of vitamin D per day (Wagner et al. 2008). Obviously these kids are probably getting some additional vitamin D from eggs, fish, or other fortified foods, but since that will vary from child to child, I hesitate to spread the word that 2 cups of milk provides enough vitamin D for kids. Maybe 2 cups of milk plus a tuna sandwich, but you have to consider other food sources of vitamin D.

3. There are many non-dietary factors that impact vitamin D status. The Maguire study did a nice job of investigating one of these: skin pigmentation. They found that for kids with dark skin who were not taking a vitamin D supplement, only those drinking 4 cups of milk per day appeared to have adequate vitamin D in the winter months. Other important factors include latitude, time spent in the sun, and obesity. Two cups of milk might be just right for the average kid in Toronto, but a child in Alaska would likely need more, and a child in Arizona would likely need less. The study also found that heavier kids had lower vitamin D status, so for these children, greater milk intake or vitamin D supplements might be recommended.

4. The conclusion that drinking more than 2 cups of milk per day would hurt iron status was arbitrary. Average serum ferritin in this group of kids was 31 μg/L. A child is considered iron deficient if serum ferritin is <12 μg/L. Among these kids, 4% fell into this range.  These iron-deficient kids drank an average of half a cup more milk than kids that weren’t iron-deficient. But according to the data in this paper, drinking an extra half a cup of milk per day would account for only a 0.5 μg/L drop in ferritin. And the data show that for the average kid drinking 4-5 cups of milk per day, serum ferritin was about 26 μg/L, nowhere close to iron deficient. I have no doubt that milk is one factor influencing iron nutrition, but these data suggest that it plays a relatively small role.

What is likely most important to iron nutrition is what is going on in the rest of the diet. Does the child eat good sources of dietary iron? How are they combined with milk and other foods in meals? Milk doesn’t completely block iron absorption; it lowers it, probably by about half (5,6). Other foods, including egg, soy, and whole grains, also lower iron absorption. Specifically, these foods lower the absorption of non-heme iron, which is found mainly in plant foods. The absorption of heme iron, found in meat, is very efficient and unaffected by other foods, including milk, in the meal. In addition, the presence of heme iron increases the absorption of non-heme iron in the same meal. Vitamin C also increases the absorption of non-heme iron. If you pair milk with meat, it won’t affect iron absorption. Or if your kid has a snack of a glass of milk with an apple, which has very little iron to begin with, that milk isn’t likely to impact your child’s overall iron status.

This might seem complicated, and it is. That’s why I think that telling parents that 2 cups of milk is just the right amount is silly. The data from this study are just not strong enough to add limiting milk to your list of nutrition worries.

There’s another reason why I object to limiting milk to 2 cups of milk per day. I think that we Americans are too preoccupied with restricting our diets in one way or another. It takes the joy out of eating, and it rubs off on our kids. And since the advice on what to restrict seems to change all the time, we end up confused and frustrated. If your child likes milk, I would hesitate to restrict it. It is, after all, a nice source of protein and fat and one of our best sources of calcium and vitamin D, as well as providing many other vitamins and minerals.

All of that said, it is your job as a parent to put balanced meals and snacks in front of your child. If milk is getting in the way of that, then you may want to rethink how you do things. Here’s a little advice:

  • Serve milk at the table in an open cup. (We only make an exception to this rule if we’re traveling or at a restaurant.) Serving milk this way slows the pace of drinking a bit, allowing your child to taste the milk and to feel satiety signals from it and the other food in the meal. Toddlers tend to drink more via sippy cups or bottles, especially if they’re allowed to carry them around between meals. In fact, I’d be willing to bet that most of the kids who have a problem with too much milk are getting it from a bottle, not a cup.
  • If you’re worried that your child is drinking too much milk, ask yourself these questions: Do you think milk is limiting how much food your child is eating? Does your child eat very few good sources of dietary iron? Is your child constipated often? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then you may want to consider cutting back on milk. I would encourage you to talk to your pediatrician about your concerns and have your child tested for iron deficiency.
  • If you do limit milk, serve it at predictable times. Decide that you’ll just have it at say breakfast and dinner, and let your child know that’s the plan. And don’t be afraid to break your milk rule for something like an oven-fresh batch of chocolate chip cookies!
  • Keep offering good sources of iron at meals and snacks, including both plant and animal-based sources, and add in some vitamin C-rich foods while you’re at it. Iron-rich foods can be challenging for toddlers, but don’t get discouraged. Cee is very hesitant about meat (except bacon) these days, but we keep offering it, while also trying to serve good sources of iron like legumes and fortified cereals.
  • If your child doesn’t drink much milk, be sure that he’s getting enough vitamin D in his diet or from a supplement. If you live north of Philadelphia, have dark skin, or just don’t get much sun exposure, I think that a vitamin D supplement is good for everyone in the family, especially this time of year.

How much milk does your child drink? Are you concerned that it’s too much or too little?

REFERENCES

(1) Maguire, J. L., G. Lebovic, et al. (2012). The Relationship Between Cow’s Milk and Stores of Vitamin D and Iron in Early Childhood. Pediatrics.

(2) Hypponen, E., E. Laara, et al. (2001). Intake of vitamin D and risk of type 1 diabetes: a birth-cohort study. Lancet 358(9292): 1500-1503.

(3) The EURODIAB Substudy 2 Study Group (1999). Vitamin D supplement in early childhood and risk for Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. The EURODIAB Substudy 2 Study Group. Diabetologia 42(1): 51-54.

(4) Baker, R. D. and F. R. Greer (2010). Diagnosis and prevention of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children (0-3 years of age). Pediatrics 126(5): 1040-1050.

(5) Abernathy, R. P., J. Miller, et al. (1965). Metabolic Patterns in Preadolescent Children. Xii. Effect of Amount and Source of Dietary Protein on Absorption of Iron. J Nutr 85: 265-270.

(6) Hurrell, R. F., S. R. Lynch, et al. (1989). Iron absorption in humans as influenced by bovine milk proteins. Am J Clin Nutr 49(3): 546-552.

32 Comments
  1. I’m sure he isn’t drinking two cups a milk a day. I offer him dairy products during the course of the day he might have a sippy cup or two of milk but he is eating yogurt and cheese otherwise. I don’t worry myself too much with the studies they talk about because most of the time they are not a complete picture and I take them as suggestions.

    Like

    December 21, 2012
    • That’s a good way to live – not worrying too much:) Cee probably drinks about 1-1.5 cups per day, though she does have milk with every meal and often with snack as well. She likes it but doesn’t usually drink more than about 1/4 cup at a time. I think 2 cups of milk (a full 16 oz) is quite a lot for most 2-year-olds, but I imagine that kids on the older side of the 2-5 range can drink quite a bit more (with less of an impact on their total diet and iron status).

      Like

      December 21, 2012
      • Yeah I couldn’t imagine my son drinking that much milk.

        Like

        December 21, 2012
  2. dinochick #

    Great article! Thank you. You said that Cee is hesitant on meat right now. I am having the same issue(not sure if it is really an issue?) with my daughter right now as well, who is two. I would love to hear about how you work around the meat. How do you get good protein in her diet. I am quite the carnivore and not a vegetarian by any stretch, so I am at a loss as to what I can fix for her to eat. My husband is very worried about her protein intake, so we are looking for solutions. Any tips you might have would be greatly appreciated!

    Like

    December 21, 2012
    • I am borderline worried about this with Cee as well. One of the reasons that I wouldn’t want to restrict her milk intake is that it is a good source of protein for her. What also save us are peanut butter, eggs (usually scrambled), and legumes, like lentils and other beans. Eggs aren’t a great source of iron, but legumes are. And I also count on her getting some iron from grains, both whole grains and fortified cereals and breads. It’s a good reason to keep the classic Cheerios around.

      Like

      December 21, 2012
      • By the way, this would be a great topic for another post, because this is a common experience with toddlers!

        Like

        December 21, 2012
      • I agree, I think it would be a great topic! I know we are not alone in this. Glad to hear we are doing the same thing that you are. Eggs and beans being my go-to food recently. I wonder if Almond Butter is good for protein, we can not get our daughter to eat peanut butter (she loves almond butter however). We work some polenta in as well, because I was told that the polenta+beans makes a complete carb.
        Thanks!

        Like

        December 21, 2012
        • According to the USDA database, almond butter is a pretty good source of protein, though it doesn’t have as much as peanut butter. I think it is a great choice though – healthy fats, vitamin E, etc. This is a great resource if you’d like to look up nutrient composition of foods: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/

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          December 21, 2012
      • Excellent! Thank you!

        Like

        December 21, 2012
    • My boy (18 months) doesn’t care for meat too terribly much either. I was a vegetarian for 10 years and so I am not really that concerned with it. There are so many excellent foods out there that toddlers do love to eat that having meat doesn’t need to be a major concern. Check out some vegetarian recipes (or even go nuts and try a vegan recipe or two), you will probably find some good dishes that the whole family will love.

      Like

      December 27, 2012
    • maggie #

      We found that we could get a lot of meat in her diet if we did soup, or if we allowed her to dip it in any type of sauce. We also had a lot of success with humus, fish, and with hash/mince/pulverized. We noticed that what our daughter didn’t want to do was chew the meat, probably because her teeth and jaw were almost always sore. Another great success is the Greek style yogurt, and you can mix it with fruit juice to make a lasse for a nice portable car snack.

      Like

      January 2, 2013
  3. My son is lactose-intolerant and highly sensitive to any liquid milk (unless its canned or otherwise cooked) However, before we figured this out, I did limit milk consumption if only to help him eat well. We used milk as a “snack,” and I try to think about milk as a food and not a beverage.

    I found that when we gave him milk with meals, he would drink the milk, get full, and eat very little. I suppose YMMV, but I thought this practice served us well.

    Like

    December 21, 2012
    • Michelle, thanks for this comment! I knew there would be some smart folks disagreeing with my take on this. I agree that we should consider milk a food and not a beverage, and I can understand limiting it or only offering it at specific times if you think it is getting in the way of eating other foods. I just think that we should be careful about prescriptive nutrition recommendations when the data are shaky and the situation usually much more complex from home to home. For my friend, whose daughter drinks milk with every meal but also eats well, I wouldn’t recommend imposing such a restriction.

      Like

      December 21, 2012
      • I totally agree, especially with your skepticism about the nutritional aspects of the study. It sounds an awful lot like the “don’t eat spinach if you have broken bones” meme.

        I do, however, find that many parents of “picky eaters” offer milk with every meal, and in fact, push it on their kids. I think switching milk to snacks can really be helpful in that instance.

        (And thanks for saying I’m smart! 😉 )

        Like

        December 22, 2012
  4. mt #

    Here in Denmark, we are way north of Philadelphia (our US homebase!) and they are adamant about the vitamin D. At each checkup, the doctors and nurses attack us with, “YOU’RE GIVING HIM THE VITAMIN DROPS, RIGHT???” (We are.) You didn’t mention iron supplements–are they just as good as getting iron from food? Our doctor recommended giving our son, 7 months, iron drops. We’ve been doing that, so I haven’t been too obsessed with iron content in his solids, especially since we’re just introducing new foods. But perhaps that should change, at least so we get into the habit of having iron-rich foods in his rotation.

    Like

    December 21, 2012
  5. My toddler has 2 sippy cups, one after breakfast, one an hour before bed. If at childcare, he’ll maybe have another at snacktime. If given the chance, he’d drink milk more as he loves it (takes after me as I used to drink lots as a child). I’m not too worried as he eats well, and a good balanced diet. Plus as we’re on a farm, he loves being outside so should get the recommended time outside each day.

    Like

    December 21, 2012
  6. Zandra #

    I love your list of advice! Great tips. Especially the cup rather than all-day sippy cup (or bottle) tip. I’d add switching from whole to 1% or nonfat is important once a child is two years old (for obesity reasons — a lot of kids consume a lot of calories in liquid form.)

    Like

    December 21, 2012
    • I would argue that switching to 1% or nonfat would really depend on the child and their dietary needs.

      Like

      December 27, 2012
  7. Elaine #

    it is almost overbearing how much cows’ milk gets pushed on us by healthcare professionals these days. dairy products are a non-essential part of our diet. While i am not questioning the fact that it is nutrient-rich, it is also high in sugar. Children should ONLY have water in their sippy cups before bed or even throughout the day. There are so many other sources of calcium (take unsweetened vitamin D fortified almond milk or unsweetened NON-GMO organic soy beverages for example). The myth that humans are true carnivores has long been busted; we actually thrive on a plant-based diet (if it is implemented properly). My children, aged 2 and 4, are healthy and they do not drink cows’ milk.

    Like

    December 21, 2012
    • Although you make valid points, your statement that “children should ONLY have water in their sippy cups before bed or even throughout the day” is inaccurate and a belief, not a fact. I also do not understand the concern with sugar being in milk. Sugar in milk is naturally occurring, it is not refined sugar. There are many plant foods that are also considered high in sugar, but they should not be considered unhealthy. Sugars are good for us, when they are naturally occurring.

      Like

      December 27, 2012
    • Leslie #

      I agree, Elaine! There are other dangers of milk as well. There is data suggesting that early intake of cow’s milk (so very different from human milk!) is linked to insulin regulation problems and thus diabetes. You can get Vitamin D and iron from supplements or plenty of vegan sources, which are much healthier than animal fat and protein products. The dairy lobby has done an amazing job making cow’s milk seem wholesome and necessary when it is, in fact, neither. More to say, but out of room!

      Like

      January 5, 2013
      • Leslie #

        I do agree that lacing eating with complete restriction and anxiety is bad for your child, bad for the enjoyment of meals, family and otherwise, and that an absolutist stance against nearly any food is toxic and exhausting. But making plants the basis of our diet, and making loads of gorgeous, delicious plant-based meals for everyone to savor in our house is still my goal. I do not let my one year old drink cow’s milk, but she has almond milk and some dairy.

        Like

        January 5, 2013
  8. I have a hard time trying to convince my husband that there is such a thing as too much cow’s milk; he seems to think the more the better. Fortunately, I am the one usually in charge of her snacks, not him. Also, she only has an open cup. (It’s funny, you would think that being Japanese he would be suspicious of cow’s milk, but no)

    I wonder how all this fits into the whole debate about whether formula feeding parents should switch to cow’s milk OR continue formula after their child turns 12 months….

    Like

    December 26, 2012
  9. Excellently written. I like your point about restricting food for children. Despite the “obesity epidemic” in the US, there is a high incidence of underweight children in middle and upper income families due to concerns of their children becoming obese.

    Like

    December 27, 2012
  10. Sarah #

    I know I’m weighing in a little late – it’s been busy! – but I’m interested in whether you might change your attitude if your milk was NOT fortified with Vitamin D. It seems vitamin D is the (or one of the) vitamin(s) du jour (the new vitamin C?), at least in the USA and North America, and thus the milk there is fortified with it. But here in Oz, it’s not. In fact there’s not a lot of talk about it at all, apart from being told to get 8 minutes of sunshine at 10am or 4pm. And of course apply layers of sunscreen at all other times! (Incidentally, the reality of doing this is quite tricky and doesn’t actually happen. Like I set the alarm for 10am, stop whatever I’m doing and pop out for a quick sunbathe. It also doesn’t help that all kids at daycares and preschools must be covered head to toe with sunscreen at drop off time, which means they miss the window too.) Anyway, I digress. Vitamin D seems to still be under the radar here and it is hard to get a supplement of it, or even a multivitamin with a decent dosage in. Of course, milk does provide other minerals, but that doesn’t appear to be what the study was looking at – it seemed to treat milk more or less as merely a vehicle for vitamin D.

    However, one mineral that seems to be more in the press here, is iodine. It seems that a lot of folk here have mild iodine deficiencies, but I hardly ever hear of talk about it in the US. Do you think that’s because studies have shown no deficiencies, or whether it’s just they haven’t looked?

    Happy New Year!

    Like

    December 28, 2012
  11. Heidi Rabbach #

    Thank you for another helpful article! I am slightly worried now, though, since neither milk nor cereal are fortified where I live. So I wonder if there is any way to ensure a sufficient intake without having to obsess about Vitamin D and iron rich food or taking supplements long-term. Babies get supplements until the end of the winter after their first birthday and then it’s supposed to be covered through diet and sun exposure. But that doesn’t seem to be that easy. Do you have any advice or even toddler-approved recipes?

    Like

    January 4, 2013
  12. I really enjoy reading your blog, not only because of the scientific facts, but for the heart felt messages and discussion as well. My daughter just turned one last week, so we started giving cow’s milk. She loves it, as I assumed she would. Our pediatrician recommended 12-20 oz per day. She probably gets 25-30 oz, but I’m not going to sweat it because you are right- the recommendations are constantly changing. Weren’t “they” trying to push milk with all the “GOT MILK” ads? Anyway, bottom line is I will worry more about giving her too much candy and other foods with absolute no nutritional value rather than good ole’ milk. Yes, we “got milk.” 🙂

    Like

    February 10, 2013
  13. Jenn #

    My son, who is 9 1/2 yrs old, is an absolute milk addict. We buy whole milk because he has never been a big eater, and constantly argue that he choose water or juice or anything else throughout the day and he will, but not happily. I hadn’t before considered the possibility of an iron deficiency, but I will mention it to his pediatrician when we seem him next, as I can certainly see signs of this in my son. He’s been diagnosed with ADHD, so we pay a lot of attention to his diet and making sure he gets fish oils, etc.

    One question – if we wanted to substitute cow’s milk as the go-to for drinking and cereal, what would you recommend as a good alternative? Seems there are so many, and I’ve recently read that even soy be restricted, so it’s all confusing. Not sure my son will go for the taste of an alternative, but if he has no other choice, I suppose he’ll drink water! 🙂

    Thanks!

    Like

    May 13, 2013
  14. kathy #

    i have a friend that has a 5 yr old daughter and she drinks at least half a gallon of milk a day,no juice and very little water,it takes her about 45 mins when she go’s to the bathroom to do her buisness,she constapated often,i thought its because she’s having to much milk am i wrong,most kid’s have a sippy cup she carries a half gallon squeese bottle around ! she would drink more if it’s there,,,this worrie’s me.

    Like

    June 16, 2013
  15. delisa #

    I just bought two gallons of milk on Sunday morning. My husband eats cereal for breakfast and drinks milk with dinner. I only put milk in my coffee. By Tuesday night we have just enough milk to get through dinner. My 11-year-old son is drinking the rest. I don’t limit his consumption because he is healthy and it is 1% milk. I don’t believe he is low on iron, because he eats cereal and meat, and his favorite vegetable is broccoli.

    Like

    July 15, 2014
  16. Val B #

    My daughter is 1 and half and she drinks four 8 oz bottles of homo milk a day. She eats lots of carbs, veggies and fruits in a day. No meat. I have tried. She does not like any type of meat. She is not big or small she is average super energetic, rarely sick, and not constipated. I don’t let her have milk between meals just at breakfast, lunch, dinner and before bed. I donno if I should be worried because she seems fine? I always figured she’d grow out of drinking milk.

    Like

    May 29, 2015

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