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Learning to Crawl Disrupts Infant Sleep (Or, Science Confirms What We’ve Already Observed)

Sometimes, when you’re going through a rough patch with your baby’s sleep, it helps just to know that it’s normal. A recent study published in Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development helps in this regard, because it shows that when babies learn to crawl, they have a harder time sleeping during the night (1).

The study, conducted in Israel, followed 28 infants from about 5 months to 11 months of age. Every 2-3 weeks, the babies’ motor skills and sleep patterns were assessed at a home visit by a trained researcher. The researchers compared sleep patterns before crawling, during the two weeks around the onset of crawling, and during the time after crawling. Although this study was small, the measurements were detailed, and the fact that the study was longitudinal, following the same infants over time (rather than a snapshot in time of different-aged infants) make the findings pretty robust.

The babies’ motor skills were tracked by parents using an illustrated developmental checklist, and their observations were confirmed by the researcher at each home visit. Each home visit involved a 10-15 minute filmed play session during which the baby played on the floor with toys and parents. Crawling didn’t have to be the traditional hands and knees variety; it was simply defined as at least two deliberate movements forward. Babies find lots of different ways to get mobile. Here’s a video of BabyM scooting around at 8 months in his very own style, pulling forward with his arms with extra propulsion added by his big toes:

Sleep patterns in the study were measured using an actigraph that was worn on the babies’ ankle for three consecutive nights at each assessment. An actigraph measures movement (using an accelerometer, similar to a FitBit) to track when the babies are awake and asleep, allowing researchers to quantify night wakings, which was the primary measure of interest in this study. They only counted night wakings when they lasted for at least 5 minutes. (Shorter wakings were likely to be self-soothed back to sleep without asking for help from parents.)

So did learning to crawl affect the babies’ sleep? Yep. When the researchers looked at individual babies’ night wakings before, during, and after learning to crawl, they saw that the babies did indeed wake more frequently in the night when they started crawling. However, the total amount of sleep per night didn’t change.

The babies in this study started crawling as early as 4 months and 25 days and as late as 10 months and 7 days. Curious if the effects of crawling might depend on the age it began, the researchers split them down the middle into groups of early (average 6 months) and late crawlers (average 8 months). (Note that this was just how the babies in this study split when they were divided into two equal groups. The paper notes that according to World Health Organization norms, 8.3 months is considered the median time for hands and knees crawling.) Indeed, they did see a difference in sleep patterns. The early crawlers had an increase in night waking just around the time when they started crawling, but by their next home visit, they were back to normal. The late crawlers, however, showed a more gradual and sustained increase in night waking after learning to crawl. That is, they woke more often when they learned to crawl, but then they were waking even more often a few weeks later.

These data are difficult to visualize because of the large number of data points for each infant, but here is one way that the researchers show these patterns:

Z-score graph

From Scher and Cohen 2015.

The Z-scores basically measure the distance from the mean number of wakings for each individual infant, so a higher Z-score means more wakings than usual for that baby. The graph shows the average Z-scores in the early and late crawlers across time, where 0 is start of crawling, -1 and -2 are the two time points before crawling, and 1 and 2 are the two time points after crawling. As you would expect, both groups have a drop in waking between -2 and -1, indicating fewer wakings as the babies grew older. Then you can see the disruption at time 0, the onset of crawling. You can see from the figure that the early crawlers show a quick peak in waking when they learned to crawl, but they’re basically back to normal by the next time point. The late crawlers, on the other hand, show a rise in waking with crawling, and waking continues to climb over the subsequent time points.

The authors include a sobering estimate that it took the babies a full 3 months to really return to their pre-crawling trajectories for sleep development. I’m not sure how useful that number is in real life, because there are a host of other factors that can affect sleep at that time in an infant’s life, including sleep training for some babies. But what this does show is that sleep disruption is really common at this age, and in many infants, it lasts for a while before it starts to get better!

The authors of the study speculate on some possible explanations for crawling-related sleep disruption:

“Why should a downward trend in sleep regulation appear in association with the ability to locomote? One explanation for the rise in number of long wake episodes draws on the increased regulatory and emotional reactivity that accompany locomotion onset (Biringen et al., 1995; Campos et al., 2000). The locomotion dependent emotional arousal and heightened excitement, alluded to in Mahler’s theory (Mahler et al., 1975), could compromise the child’s ability to self-regulate back to sleep after a brief nighttime awakening (Anders, 1994). Another possibility is that the developmental reorganization underlying the achievement of crawling (Adolph & Berger, 2006) involves restructuring of sleep–wake states, a premise that fits well with Dahl’s model (e.g., Dahl, 1996).”

No, I’m not familiar with any of these models. That’s why I’m quoting the authors here rather than pretending I know more about them!

“In dynamic systems, downward trends in performance and in behavioral control often mark the emergence of new abilities (Adolph & Robinson, 2008; Thelen & Smith, 1994). This pattern has been identified in diverse domains of infant development including manual reaching (Corbetta & Bojczyk, 2002), vocal production (Hsu, Fogel, & Cooper, 2000), and language acquisition (Verspoor, Lowie,& van Dijk, 2008). The present study adds sleep to this diverse array of behaviors in which a downward trend in performance (herein, regulating sleep–wake states) was linked to new developmental achievements (e.g., Corbetta & Bojczyk, 2002). That the emergence of crawling marks a period of increase in long wake episodes fits well with the dynamic system principle that development is spotted with periods of progress and regress, and that regressive behaviors are precursors of moving toward the next level of developmental organization (Thelen & Smith, 1994).”

Of course, this study made me think about my own baby’s sleep. Part of the reason why it caught my eye is that it reminded me of BabyM’s nap strike around 6 months of age, when he was working hard on rolling and trying out his voice with new babbles. Many parents notice sleep disruptions around developmental milestones, when our babies seem more interested in practicing new skills than sleeping.

I have no idea if learning to crawl disrupted BabyM’s sleep. He started pulling himself across the floor on his belly, as shown in the video above, around 7 months. At the time, we were traveling, and we took another trip a few weeks later. (Travel = sleep disruption, in my experience.) Then he got his first tooth and the worst cold of his life. Not surprisingly, after all of this, he was routinely waking up 2-3 times per night, more often than he was at 3-4 months of age. If I had the time or energy (yawn…) to make a Z-score graph for him, I think it would look a lot like that graph for the late crawlers in this study. And if the infants in the study were anything like my little guy, crawling might cause an initial sleep disturbance, but other factors might add to or help to sustain that waking pattern.

Along these lines, I’m also not surprised that crawling was more disruptive when it developed later in infancy. Studies show, and I’ve observed with my own kids, that the most rapid sleep consolidation occurs in the first few months of life as babies learn night from day and are gradually able to go longer between feedings (2-4). In the second half of the first year, lots of factors can disrupt sleep, and babies that previously slept through the night may begin waking again. Maybe baby wakes and cries because of discomfort from teething or because a little crawling practice in the middle of the night makes it hard to resettle. If you’re like me, you feed the baby, because that’s usually the easiest way to help him resettle. Over time, those wakings and feedings can sometimes become habit. In my experience, more wakings and feedings can develop slowly and unintentionally, but it takes an intentional and concerted effort to get back to a reasonable night of sleep. We’re gradually working on that now with BabyM.

Did you notice a change in sleep when your baby started crawling?

REFERENCES:

  1. Scher, A. & Cohen, D. V. Sleep as a Mirror of Developmental Transitions in Infancy: The Case of Crawling. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development 80, 70–88 (2015).
  2. Anders, T. F. & Keener, M. Developmental Course of Nighttime Sleep-Wake Patterns in Full-Term and Premature Infants During the First Year of Life. I. Sleep 8, 173–192 (1985).
  3. Henderson, J. M. T., France, K. G., Owens, J. L. & Blampied, N. M. Sleeping Through the Night: The Consolidation of Self-regulated Sleep Across the First Year of Life. Pediatrics 126, e1081–e1087 (2010).
  4. Scher, A., Epstein, R. & Tirosh, E. Stability and changes in sleep regulation: A longitudinal study from 3 months to 3 years. International Journal of Behavioral Development 28, 268–274 (2004).
26 Comments
  1. Sheridan Johnson #

    that’s an interesting study and I completely agree with sleep changes around every major milestone! Walking is another huge change! Great stats 🙂

    Like

    October 1, 2015
  2. A TOTAL change. Not only did my
    little one NOT want to take his second nap anymore because he was too busy walking around observing things, but he also wears himself out during the day much faster. That’s makes for a good nights sleep for momma and family! Great article!

    Liked by 1 person

    October 1, 2015
  3. Great article! My son is about the same age as yours (DOB 12/24), and just started crawling (scooting) a week or so ago. I notice he wakes once or twice a night, but settles back down and goes back to sleep. This week he also learned to go from laying to sitting, and is sitting up when I go and get him in the morning. I wonder how this is affecting his sleep too.

    Like

    October 1, 2015
    • It’s great that he’s able to get back to sleep on his own! With that skill, maybe you won’t see much of a disruption.

      I think that our sustained increase in wakings is mostly due to travel. It was hard to let M fuss even a little when he woke in the night when we were staying with friends. We didn’t want him to wake up the other kids, so we got in the habit of just feeding him back to sleep, even though he was certainly capable of going back to sleep on his own. Now he’s relearning how to do that, and he’s doing great.

      Like

      October 1, 2015
      • Lindsay #

        How are you getting him to self soothe? Our guy was a great sleeper from the time he was 8 weeks, but ever since teething at 5 months it’s been rough. The only thing to soothe him was to nurse him back. (A bad habit we are in still at 6.5 months) What kind of methods are using to break this?? Any advice is welcome!! Thank you!

        Like

        February 5, 2016
  4. It’s nice to see some good research on this. I have experienced this firsthand with both of my children, though it affected my son more dramatically than my daughter. I wonder if gender may play a role? A question for another research team perhaps.

    Like

    October 1, 2015
  5. heidirabbach #

    Thank you for this article! My little guy is only a few weeks younger than yours and I recognised our family life in everything you said! So good to have an idea why the last weeks have been so all over the place sleepwise. And I agree with the influence of other factors like night feedings that slowly become a habit again even though your child has learned to self sooth. I certainly find breastfeeding to be the easiest way to calm him and only start looking for other ways if he refuses or seems otherwise upset… Usually our attempts to analyse possible causes lead to trying different variations of night clothing layers, changing nappies “just in case”, trying to keep him from turning on his belly (only works for so long…), teething pain and what not.
    Knowing that it really might just be related to his learning to crawl (and maybe an increased need for energy with all the exercise he’s getting…) helps a lot – and at the same time makes me hope even more that he will finally get the hang of it and stop complaining that he can’t chase his sisters yet 😉

    Like

    October 1, 2015
  6. Thank you for an interesting read! Yes, same here: T (born 30/12) had more night wakings when she started rolling and especially when she was learning to crawl (first on her belly and now on all fours). Two weeks ago I could hear her practicing “the crawl”, in her sleeping bag, all over the crib 🙂 She settled back to sleep on her own most nights which never ceases to amaze me. We did a sort of gentle ‘sleep shaping’ from the start using what I knew of baby’s sleep and following her cues; there’s been no crying-it-out and she is amazing at settling on her own if nothing is bothering her. My favourite part is that there is no guesswork of “should I go in?..” as it was with our oldest – if she’s really calling me and not just talking/sighing, I go right away.

    Like

    October 1, 2015
    • And I totally know what you mean about sleep disruptions when travelling! Impossible not to jump up at the slightest sound from baby when sleeping in hotel rooms and especially when staying with friends and family.

      Like

      October 1, 2015
  7. Absolutely agree with this! They love to practice their new skills!!

    Like

    October 2, 2015
  8. Interesting. My son only just recently learned to crawl at 12 months (a *very* late crawler), but continues to sleep well. He did go through a stage a few months ago where he would wake up in the middle of the night, fold his knees under him, and bump his bottom up and down. It was hilarious to watch on the video monitor. Sometimes he would do this for half an hour and then go back to sleep.

    Like

    October 2, 2015
  9. I just finished posting on my own blog about how my daughter’s napping had been disrupted by motor development (which for her lately has been pulling up on furniture and climbing stairs)

    Like

    October 3, 2015
  10. The study discussed was performed on 26 infants. Isn’t it too small a test group to reach these conclusions? It sounds like something that needs to be investigated further on larger groups, doesn’t it?

    Like

    October 5, 2015
    • The sample size was 28 infants, and I agree that it’s a small study. What made it powerful was that it was longitudinal with many measurements over time for each infant, and overall, 639 nights of sleep data. The finding of sleep disruption with crawling was also quite consistent; 27 of 28 infants showed disrupted sleep patterns. I would be interested in seeing studies with more babies and looking at other developmental milestones.

      Like

      October 5, 2015
  11. It is hard around this age, my baby M (31/12) has always been a “bad” sleeper but she is noticeably worse when milestones are being reached. Right now there has been proper crawling, pulling up and lots of new sounds so we are back to 3 + wake ups a night rather than one or two. She has not once slept through though but she seems to be tiring more and now often has has one longer nap (to us long is more than 40 min).

    Like

    October 10, 2015
  12. Most definitely, this is right on. My lo is almost 8 months and borderline mobile… When I read about your nap strikes, my heart jumped… Sounds exactly where we are… So interesting, amazing article!

    Like

    December 3, 2015
  13. Reblogged this on Infants, Babies, the Power of Touch and commented:
    Sometimes, when you’re going through a rough patch with your baby’s sleep, it helps just to know that it’s normal. A recent study published in Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development helps in this regard, because it shows that when babies learn to crawl, they have a harder time sleeping during the night (1).

    Like

    February 3, 2016
  14. Abby #

    This is so accurate! My son is 8 months almost 9 months. He has slept all night since 5 weeks old(I don’t know how I got so lucky!! I swear it’s the swaddle I used in him & still do!!) he started crawling about a month ago so I guess he’s in the late crawling group, yay me! He was an army crawler at first & then he just took off. He started waking up & I thought if I put his pacifier back in his mouth he would go back to sleep. Wrong. He would get so mad and have cried tears. So I pick him up & either snuggle for a few minutes or nurse him. He wakes 3-4 times a night & I just can’t bring myself to let him cry it out. Before reading this article I goggled “8 month old sleep trouble” or something like that & it said the same thing! It said that a lot if babies go through a sleep regression at 4 months old & again at 8-10 months. I don’t remember my first son doing this but I was a first time momma and would go get him every time he made a peep…..LOL and this baby is still swaddled with bumpers on both sides so he can’t roll over. And there’s not crawling or moving in his sleep. Hopefully it gets better!!!! I know I’m not alone 🙂

    Like

    February 3, 2016
  15. AK #

    Thank you for posting this! My son is almost seven months old and the last week or two (yawn, I’m too tired to keep track of time anymore!) he has been waking up every hour or two all night long. He has been getting up on his hands and knees and then rocking back and forth for a few weeks now, and just last night started hands-and-knees crawling so it’s good to know there’s a reason for the sleep regression. He has also been trying and not quite succeeding yet to pull himself up on furniture–it’s a big world out there for him! Thanks for posting.

    Like

    June 29, 2016

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